Court Reporter Jobs in 2021

Think you would make an amazing court reporter? LegalJobs offers a list of top court report jobs at some of the biggest law firms across the globe!

Found 3 jobs

Location

Position Type

Experience Level

Date Posted

Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Featured
Featured

Court Reporter

Washington, DC, USA

3 days ago

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

How do you become a court reporter?

A:

To carve out a career in court reporting, you have to earn at least a two-year college degree. Furthermore, you have to attend post-secondary courses specially designed for court reporters. You’re also expected to obtain the necessary licenses and certifications once your education is over.

Lastly, as a court reporting professional, you may be required to attend on-the-job training that lasts for several weeks.

Q:

How long do you go to school to be a court reporter?

A:

Having obtained a college degree, you’ll have to attend special programs dedicated to court reporting. Those programs may take 2–5 years to complete. However, finishing these court reporting programs isn’t the end of the educational process. Namely, when prospective court reporters finish the program, they have to attend on-the-job training. Compared to the previous courses, this training is quite short — it lasts only two weeks.

Q:

What hours do court reporters work?

A:

Court reporters who work at local, state, or federal courts have typical working hours. This means that their working time is 40 hours a week. On the other hand, freelance reporters have flexible working hours. The same applies to broadcast captioners and CART providers who work from home. They are not strictly tied to office hours, so they have somewhat flexible working hours.

Q:

What is the role of the court reporter?

A:

Court reporters produce official word-for-word transcripts at hearings, trials, criminal, civil, and other court proceedings. Some work outside the courtroom as real-time translation (CART) providers and broadcast captioners. The former assist and accompany deaf and hard of hearing individuals, while the latter produce captions for live or pre-recorded TV programs.

Q:

Is court reporting hard?

A:

Court reporting positions are challenging and intense, as they require the professional to remain focused during the whole court proceeding. They have to pay great attention to detail and revise the transcript to check for errors. The work pace is fast, and there is no room for mistakes and errors. The reason is quite simple — any mistakes can have serious consequences. Such pressure can be excruciating at times.

Q:

Is court reporting stressful?

A:

Court reporting is stressful for the very same reasons it’s intense. Court reporters have to stay focused during the entire trial that can sometimes last for hours. They also have to be impeccable and pay attention to every detail, as no error is allowed. This may impose a high level of stress and pressure, which might eventually lead to burnout.

Q:

How much does a court reporter make per hour?

A:

On an annual basis, court reporters make an average of $60,130. On an hourly basis, this sum amounts to $26 per hour. Court reporters’ salaries at top industries amounted to $68,020 for state governments and $63,700 for local governments. Court reporting professionals involved in business support services earn $48,690.

Freelancers are paid per hour spent at work. However, they have the opportunity to sell their transcripts and thus earn extra cash.

Q:

Will court reporters be replaced by computers?

A:

The jobs of court reporters are gradually taken over by audio and video technology. In fact, adopting this technology may save $30,000–$40,000 per year. Besides, many lawmakers believe that voice recognition software could adequately clone a court reporter’s services at much lower costs.

However, computers won’t be able to replace court reporters completely. Artificial Intelligence may replace a human to some extent, but it takes a (human) professional to monitor artificial intelligence.

Q:

Are court reporters in high demand?

A:

Yes, court reporters are increasingly sought after due to the federal regulations that require extended use of captioning for TV, the internet, and other technologies. Thus, TV networks will engage many broadcast captioners to comply with these regulations.

Besides, the elderly population growth will increase the necessity for CART providers to follow them at appointments and meetings. Additionally, cinemas and stadiums will provide closed captioning for hard of hearing people. All these facts prove that court reporter jobs will be in great demand for quite a while.