Everything You Need to Know About Civil Rights Law Jobs in 2021

If you are passionate about protecting individuals' freedom, we suggest you consider a career in civil rights law.

Found 3 jobs

Location

Position Type

Experience Level

Date Posted

Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
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Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title
Hiring Cutting Machine
LegalJobs
Unites States, New York
Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title Tag title

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

How to become a civil rights lawyer?

A:

In addition to developing a passion for social justice, a future human rights attorney needs to complete many years of schooling. As there isn’t a specific civil rights law degree to pursue, the educational path for all aspiring attorneys is more or less the same. It involves obtaining a bachelor’s degree, preferably one that has something to do with the field of law, getting into law school, obtaining the Juris Doctor degree, and passing the American Bar Association’s admission test. 

Q:

What does a civil rights attorney do?

A:

When an individual’s civil rights have been violated or abused, that person has the right to file a civil lawsuit against those responsible, be it another individual or an institution. It’s part of a civil rights attorney’s job description to help ensure the best possible outcome for the person whose rights have been violated. Throughout the process of aiding their clients, civil rights attorneys take on a variety of tasks such as conducting research, creating legal documents, negotiating settlements, and arguing cases in court.

These law practitioners’ job is also to educate their clients about their rights and to keep up with civil rights-related laws and regulations, as they may change over time.

Q:

What type of law is civil rights?

A:

Steps to becoming a civil rights attorney include learning about civil rights laws - federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination in settings such as education, voting, employment, housing, lending, and more. These laws apply to everyone in a society and guarantee equal rights to all individuals regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, etc. For example, federal civil rights laws prevent public companies in the leisure and hospitality sector, such as hotels and restaurants, from treating customers differently based on their race. 

In addition to federal and state laws, there are also civil rights laws and ordinances enacted by municipalities such as cities and towns.

Q:

What do civil rights lawyers major in?

A:

Most law schools require an undergraduate degree from their prospective students. However, there are no specific undergraduate majors for civil rights law, and you won’t be denied admission to law school based on the major you chose for your bachelor’s degree studies. Even though there isn’t a “right” major to pursue to get into law school, prelaw students may benefit from focusing on courses in English, history, political science, philosophy, public speaking, economics, business, and journalism. 

Furthermore, completing undergraduate studies in human rights or government may provide a lot of useful information about the field and potentially prove advantageous when applying for civil rights law jobs.