Everything You Need to Know About Environmental Law Jobs in 2021

Passionate about the environment? Want to save the sharks? See the list of environmental law jobs and be a part of the change!

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Hiring Cutting Machine
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Unites States, New York
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Frequently Asked Questions

Q:

Can you make money in environmental law?

A:

Environmental lawyers’ jobs are in higher demand today than ever before. With an average annual salary of $118,936 in 2019, there are fantastic possibilities to make good money in environmental law. 

This, however, depends on your position in the organization, level of experience, and most importantly your location. 

For example, the median salary for environmental lawyers is much higher in Washington (around $103,000) than in Montana (about $67,000). 

Finally, some roles in environmental law get paid more than others. For instance, environmental law paralegal jobs are paid on average $71,740.

Q:

Is environmental law a growing field?

A:

Environmental policy and planning are the two fastest-growing fields of law, and they play a key role in the preservation and management of the world’s natural resources. 

Environmental law degree jobs in the field of policy have an impact on public regulations, and people in these positions create legal standards for environmental conservation. With the growing number of agencies and bodies dealing with environmental protection standards, there will be more jobs in this field in the future. 

Likewise, environmental planning careers carry huge potential. Positions in this field have a task in developing programs for more efficient use of the land. By generating research on the use of natural resources, they evaluate the risk for damage and plan mitigation solutions.

Q:

How much money do environmental lawyers make?

A:

According to the most recent info, the annual salary of an environmental lawyer is $118,936 on average. This, of course, depends on multiple factors, such as level of education or experience, location, and the organization you work for.

Junior attorney and entry-level positions typically begin with an annual salary of around $60,000 to $80,000, depending on the location. Senior lawyers generally receive annual salaries of well over $100,000.

Q:

What can you do with a degree in environmental law?

A:

An environmental lawyer can work in many different fields. Whether you prefer environmental law policy jobs in governmental organizations or defending the interests of private corporations, your options are many. 

The focus of this sector is on regulations that define how humans should interact with the surrounding nature, air, land, or water. As such, those in this field can work on renewable energy environmental law jobs, climate change and sustainability projects, pollution and waste management, or many other areas. 

Aside from a career as a lawyer, a person with a degree in environmental law can work as an environmental law enforcer or professor.

Q:

How many hours do environmental lawyers work?

A:

Based on BLS statistics, the majority of lawyers, including environmental specialists, tend to work around 40 hours a week. 

However, this is not set in stone, and it can vary depending on numerous factors. It’s not uncommon for those in private law firms or paralegals conducting research to work nights and weekends. 

For those environmental law jobs involving any kind of representation in the courtroom, hours can stretch even longer depending on the nature of the particular case.